Reverse Mortgages & Long Term Care Insurance

beach What does this picture of the beach have to do with reverse mortgages and long term care? Nothing, but I have to get out of this heat and to a beach soon, just so you know…..

Ok, onward. I recently wrote an article for The Union, our general circulation newspaper here in Grass Valley, California exploring the topic of seniors’ potential long term care needs, long term care insurance, and reverse mortgages, written from the prospective of how my client expressed to me her thoughts on taking out a reverse mortgage credit line for her “maybe” future need of in home care vs. taking out a long term care insurance policy:

Recently a client reinforced the trend I’m seeing for clients’ to use a reverse mortgage credit line as not only a source of income as needed, a standby source of emergency funds, but also as an alternative to long term care insurance premiums.

It is estimated that approximately 70% of people turning 65 will need long-term care at some point in their lives. It is an uncertain expense, no life crystal ball. There are various methods to fund the cost: long term care insurance, Medicaid, self funding through savings, liquidation of personal assets, and/or a reverse mortgage credit line.

Genworth Financial, a long term care insurer, estimates approximately $45,750 annually for in home health aide, $80,300 annually for shared nursing home rooms, while assisted living costs vary dependent on the level of care.

Long term care insurance did not appeal to her: paying premiums for an insurance she was not sure she would ever need, coupled with the risk of rising premiums.

Medicaid would require her to liquidate nearly all her assets to qualify, wanting assets for heirs, she ruled out this option.

She owns her home outright, has retirement income and IRA assets, yet she decided to obtain a RM credit line loan as a standby in the event she needs in home care. The growth feature of the RM credit line was an added bonus: on amortization charts she was able to see how her reverse mortgage credit line borrowing ability grew over time. What was also appealing to her: she did not have to use her reverse mortgage credit line unless in home care was required, and if it was, then she controls the decisions and spending for care, thus eliminating having to negotiate with an insurer, and that she will only accrue an interest charge on funds actually borrowed.

Should she not need in home care, her untapped RM credit line will revert to inheritable equity for her heirs upon the home’s sale. As with all reverse mortgage loans she retains ownership and control of her home.

Shawna McDonald, Loan Officer, has successfully completed hundreds of reverse mortgages and is approved with 9 reverse mortgage lenders, ensuring clients receive low fees and great rates. Her office, Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage, is located at 412 E. Main Street Suite N Grass Valley, (530) 497-3010. Her website is www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com.

The opinions expressed here are solely those of Shawna McDonald, Loan Officer/Real Estate Broker Associate. Copyright © 2016. Shawna McDonald NMLS #271335 CA-BRE # 00585530 DBA Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage, Borba Investments Inc, DBA MLS Reverse Mortgage Auburn, CA NMLS #76801 BRE #01456165 ~ Company MLS #76801

 

 

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The Changed Faces of Reverse Mortgage Loan Clients

fall leaf candles  I  hope that when I retire I can do crafty things like, say in October, make leaf lined candle jars, because I just never seem to have time  while working full time at what I love:  helping Grass Valley, Nevada City and Penn Valley seniors stay in their homes monthly mortgage payment free, with a reverse mortgage, the “peace of mind” loan. Truth be told, I love what I do so much that I just may never get to craft leafy type things anytime soon.

If you want to skip this blog post and go directly to my website or contact me for an appointment, here you go: http://www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com or (530) 497-4010.

This is a non-technical post, lately I’ve done mostly technical type blog posts about different aspects of reverse mortgages, but as I enter my 8th year of full time specialization in reverse mortgages I’m reflecting on the changed faces of whom I am helping with the “peace of mind loan” once the loan is complete.   I have had almost all my clients of late call it such when we’ve either paid off their existing mortgage, created a credit line for them, or a combination of both, a few opt for lifetime incomes. When I check back in with clients, to a person, they all express the same things: that they were losing sleep over a depleted savings accounts and worrying about the inevitable repair, health crisis, or need for a newer car, all things in the back of their minds they knew could not be covered by savings, and that this loan had restored their peace in life and ability to enjoy life fully without nagging worry and sleep loss. Or, for the some of my clients, who could cover these types of expenses, but to do so the concern was they had to take more than mandatory draws out of a retirement fund, and then often they worried that they had “wasted money” to pay for a tax consequence in doing so.  Or the worry over NDFA, (No Damn Fooling Around) industry acronym for property taxes are due in November, must be paid by December, due in February must be paid by April. Ugh, worry over property taxes or the ever increasing fire and casualty costs that come with living in our beautiful mountain area, that’s no fun.

Often in the initial meeting or workshop seminar the clients I meet have worried faces, when the loan is complete there is a spring again in their step, a look on their faces of a weight lifted. Years ago I owned a successful real estate company in Sebastopol in Sonoma County, few women back then in all of Sonoma County had accomplished this, I was proud of having done so. Of course I was happy when the day came to hand over the keys to excited new homeowners, but nothing compares to the feeling I get now when I call clients to tell them we’ve just completed their reverse mortgage loan, and then a week or so later we meet for me to give them a thank you gift, because that is when I see happier faces and hear them feel free to express to me their feelings of relief and peace of mind restored, that’s their gift to me.

hammock

It’s a small community, even further down the line I run into my clients here and there post loan, that’s when I receive another  gift from clients, when they tell me how their life has changed post reverse mortgage: what new things they now can do, share with me a picture or two of a trip to see grandchildren, a motorhome taken out of storage and pictures of a trip, (where as before the gas had become too much of a budget buster to take trips at all), a falling apart deck now repaired and used for bbq’s and family gatherings, one set of clients whose mortgage was paid off through a reverse mortgage were still working part time well into their 70’s to cover the monthly payment, their comment was “we now have time to lay in a hammock and read a book overlooking the pond on our land, in our home”. Yes, I’m the lucky one indeed.

~Shawna McDonald, Loan Officer NMLS #271335, Real Estate Broker 00585530

Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage 412 E. Main Street, Grass Valley 530-497-3010

http://www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com

Reverse Mortgage Mid-Year Round Up ~ 2015

Seniors at the fair 1 It’s been a great week, the Nevada County Fair rocks !

seniors at the fair 2  Ok, back to business:

If you’d like more information about my local bricks and mortar reverse mortgage loan office serving Nevada County, Grass Valley, Nevada City and Penn Valley, click on this link: http://www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com.

      I’m always available with a same day return phone call: (530) 497-3010.

Here’s my newest blog post which will appear shortly in the local Union newspaper:

Reverse Mortgage Mid-Year Round Up ~ 2015

It’s true, today marks more than “mid-year”, but time flies so fast. I thought it a good time to discuss what the reverse mortgage landscape looks like after the new financial assessment requirement had been in place for a few months and discuss a recurring question I hear from clients:

The new Financial Assessment Requirement: Prior to April of this year a senior’s continuing ability to pay property taxes, insurance and (HOA dues if applicable) post completion of a reverse mortgage was not in question with the lender or HUD. (Housing and Urban Development sets the rules for reverse mortgages, FHA insures the loan). Starting in late April of this year all loan officers beginning a reverse mortgage loan application, be it for purposes of establishing a credit line, paying off an existing loan, or a purchase reverse, are required to document income and on-going household debt obligations to determine if the borrower(s) have sufficient monthly residual funds to budget for payment of property taxes and insurance. If not, we would, as part of the loan, need to set up a lifetime set aside for taxes and insurance, an “escrow” type of account.

I’m happy to report that none of my borrowers coming in to initiate a reverse mortgage and falling under the “new rule” have been required to set up such an account, I was able to document that they had were sufficient retirement income and history of on time payment for taxes and insurance. The new rule requires more work on my part, a bit of financial records digging for borrowers, but all in all, not a big deal.

Living Trusts, Revocable or Non-Revocable: Having just lugged a large trust binder into my office for me to scan, my borrowers were curious as to why a reverse mortgage lender needs to review a complete copy of their trust. The lender needs to determine if the trust is revocable, as in, can a change be made to the trust? If the trust is revocable the borrower(s) will sign a document at loan closing that states their trust recognizes the reverse mortgage obligation to be paid off upon the passing of the borrower(s). If the trust is non-revocable a reverse mortgage cannot be done, most trusts however are revocable.

Shawna McDonald Loan Officer, has successfully completed 100’s of reverse mortgages and is approved with 8 reverse mortgage lenders, ensuring clients receive low fees and great rates. Her full service office, Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage, is located at 412 E. Main Street Suite N, Grass Valley, (530) 497-3010. Her website is www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com.

The opinions expressed here are solely those of Shawna McDonald, Loan Officer/Real Estate Broker. Copyright © 2015. NMLS #271335 BRE # 00585530 DBA Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage and Borba Investments Inc, DBA MLS Reverse Mortgage Auburn, CA NMLS #76801 BRE #01456165 ~ HUD approved lender.

New Article Goes Main Stream: Pros and Cons of a Reverse Mortgage

seniors hiking

Want to skip the article and learn more about Reverse Mortgages from a Grass Valley Specialist? Visit my website

http://www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com

I must admit, in the seven years I’ve specialized in reverse mortgage there have been some articles published about reverse mortgages that were so full of inaccuracies that it was truly jaw dropping. I had wished I could call the editor or writers of such articles and tell them to “take a hike”. In recent years our national organization, NRMLA: National Association of Reverse Mortgage Lenders, has become proactive in contacting news organizations to clarify or rebut articles which are untrue, misleading or carry outright mischaracterizations of the rules and options of a reverse mortgage. I think these efforts have been fruitful because in the last year I see news articles which are not necessarily “rah rah” reverse mortgage, but balanced and accurate about this loan product. I’ve included in this blog post one from the publication “Equities.com”  which is a concise and accurate discussion of the pros and cons of a reverse mortgage.

Yesterday I met with several home owners who were considering putting up there homes for sale so that they could unlock the thousands of dollars they have accumulated as home equity. One came to me via a referral from a past client, the other from a financial planner. Both were single individuals who dearly love their homes but had not previously considered a reverse mortgage because they were a bit “scary”. My monthly workshop seminars were not at convenient times for them,  so they came into my Grass Valley office and I spent and hour with each client explaining the program’s history, current status, the overall program rules and safeguards, and the types of reverse mortgage loans now available that would fit their particular retirement goals, then sent them off with an information packet and dvd to document and review what we discussed. The big sigh of relief and frankly amazement both clients expressed as they left my office was a professionally gratifying to me. Why? Because while a reverse mortgage may not be the path they choose, one or both may still decide to sell their home to unlock their accumulated equity rather than do a reverse mortgage to tap into it, I was pleased that two more individuals walked out of my office knowing that a reverse mortgage is no more “scary” than any other loan is “scary”.

MY NEXT SEMINAR WORKSHOP is on Thursday August 13th, catered lunch is provided, we actually have a fun and lively time, give me a call if you’d like to register to attend. (530) 497-3010,

Want to learn more about my credentials and back ground? GO TO:

http://www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com

Here is a reprint of the article I spoke of above

THE PROS AND CONS OF A REVERSE MORTGAGE, reprint from http://www.equities.com

For the past few decades, you have gradually invested in your home in the form of interior renovations, exterior upgrades, steady overall maintenance, and of course, the diligent payment of your monthly mortgage every month. Through the years, as your total mortgage balance decreased and your equity increased, you began to indulge in the sort of daydreams that are typical when anticipating retirement. Your mind often wandered to visions of strolling along the beach as you feel the sand between your toes, sprawling out on a hammock as the sunshine kisses your face, and laughing lightheartedly as a cool breeze plays with your hair. With your 9-to-5 job obligations behind you, a home that has been paid off, and your children all grown-up and self-sustaining, you are free to focus on the new adventure of this next stage in life. However, one question may come to mind more often than you would like: Can I afford the retirement I want?

Retirement and the Reverse Mortgage

Because of the equity you have built up in your home, your biggest asset is now holding the answer to a financially stable retirement. Your first step to financing your lifestyle through home equity is to research the best tool to access it. To access home equity, borrowers typically have three options:

  1. Sell the home
  2. Assume a 2nd mortgage
  3. Take out a reverse mortgage loan

For many senior homeowners who want to age in their homes and who do not want to get locked into paying monthly mortgage payments again, the third option has proven to be noticeably popular.

reverse mortgage is defined as a loan that helps senior homeowners who are 62 years or older access a portion of their home equity to use as cash. Of course, there is so much more to this loan than this simple definition. Since its inception in the early 1960s, this loan has evolved into a powerful financial tool in retirement. For the past half century, senior homeowners have been utilizing this option to access their equity and achieve the type of retirement they always wanted. However, when considering the reverse mortgage loan, or any financial product for that matter, it is always a good idea to educate yourself on the pros and cons. Knowing the advantages and disadvantages can help you to determine if this loan will be a good fit for your needs.

The Pros and Cons

The following are some of the pros and cons associated with reverse mortgage loans.

PROS:

  • You may age in place while accessing a portion of your equity as cash.
  • You retain ownership of your home as long as you fulfill all loan obligations such as paying property taxes, homeowners insurance, and basic home maintenance and repairs.
  • The most common reverse mortgage, called a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) loan is government insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) which covers repayment of any difference between loan balance and home value.
  • Consumers are protected from owing more than the value of the home when sold.
  • This loan is non-recourse, which means the home is the only asset the lender can take to repay the loan.
  • Costs, such as the mortgage insurance premium that comes with federal insurance, may be rolled into the total balance of the loan.
  • Loan repayment is deferred to whenever the borrower permanently leaves the home; thus no monthly mortgage payment is required.
  • You may use reverse mortgage loan funds for anything you desire, including home repairs, renovations, and upgrades.

CONS:

  • The cons of a reverse mortgage included the fact that you may not live anywhere else other than your home for more than 12 consecutive months. If you do, the loan becomes due and payable.
  • Depending on an assessment of your financial profile, you may be required to set aside a portion of your funds to pay your financial obligations.
  • If your heirs want to keep the home, they will need to find an alternative method to repay the loan that does not involve selling the property, such as taking out a new loan to repay the reverse mortgage balance.
  • A lien will be placed on the home until the loan is repaid at maturity.

Is the Reverse Mortgage Loan Right For You?

Along with reverse mortgage pros and cons, it is also important to know the circumstances in which this loan may or may not be a good fit.

There are a few instances where this loan may not be the most beneficial solution. Because one of the loan terms include a requirement that you reside in the home as your primary residence, if you anticipate the possibility that you may move away in the foreseeable future, such as into a nursing home or a family member’s home, the loan may become due and payable.

Moving out of your home soon after completing the loan is also inefficient due to the closing costs you had already spent. In addition, if you are not comfortable with paying, or cannot afford to pay your property taxes, homeowners’ insurance, and basic home repairs then this loan may not be for you. Since there are no monthly mortgage payments required for a reverse mortgage, failing to fulfill these other financial obligations may lead you to defaulting on the loan.

However, if you desire to access a portion of your equity while aging in place, you have no plans to sell your home or move out in the foreseeable future, and you want to eliminate your monthly mortgage payments, then a reverse mortgage may be the financial solution for you. With features that allow you to defer repayment, it is a versatile solution to increase your monthly cash flow and supplement your social security income and pension – all with the protection of federal insurance.

Now that you know more about the pros and cons of a reverse mortgage, as well as the circumstances regarding whether this loan may or may not be a good fit, you can make a more educated decision on if it may benefit your needs. For more help, speak with a reverse mortgage expert from a reputable industry lender. Armed with their knowledge and yours, you will be well on your way to funding the retirement of your dreams.

5 Ways Reverse Mortgages Serve as a Retirement Tool

Senior studying paperwork

In today’s world, Americans face a looming retirement crisis — one that has been well-documented over the past several years and which has created a new purpose for the reverse mortgage.

Gone are the days when reverse mortgages were considered a loan of last resort. Now, the product is gaining steam among financial planners as a retirement tool that can hedge against future costs and provide much-needed income during borrowers’ post-career days.

By using a reverse mortgage to tap into home equity and fund retirement expenses, homeowners can effectively defend against the imminent retirement crisis, research shows.

“A lot of times people have not accumulated [savings] in a disciplined way, but at the same time the value of their homes has appreciated dramatically,” said Dennis Channer, principal at Cornerstone Investment Advisors. “A great deal of their wealth is tied up in that value. [Home equity] becomes another available resource in the long range forecast of being successful [in retirement].”

And that’s just what Wednesday’s webinar, “Standby Reverse Mortgages: A Portfolio Longevity Strategy,” was focused on teaching. Its purpose was to educate financial advisors on how a home equity conversion mortgage (HECM) could be used as a portfolio protection strategy.

“The ideas are endless on the different angles we can take on using the [reverse mortgage],” said Dr. John Salter, an associate professor of financial planning at Texas Tech University, who has educated financial planners on reverse mortgages for years. “There’s nothing wrong with the product.”

While the ways to use a reverse mortgage may be endless, Salter explained five strategies, in particular, for financial planners to keep in mind when clients are approaching retirement.

1. Use Reverse Mortgage Instead of HELOC

There are benefits borrowers can get from using a reverse mortgage that they can’t get from using a HELOC, Salter said. Among those benefits are line of credit growth, no monthly principle or interest payment, and the loan is not cancelable as long as requirements are met.

“If you’re looking for flexibility in repaying [the loan], you get that in a reverse mortgage; you don’t get that in a HELOC,” he added.

A HECM is also non-recourse, meaning the borrower or their estate will never owe more than the value of the home upon sale or death.

The only downside of a reverse mortgage is the age requirement, as there is no restriction on age when using a HELOC.

2. Refinance Existing Mortgage With a HECM

Use a HECM to refinance an existing mortgage, and either pay it off or not, Salter said.

In doing so, a borrower can eliminate their monthly mortgage payment.

3. Take Advantage of HECM For Purchase

While the HECM For Purchase (H4P) market has yet to take off, Salter said using a reverse mortgage to buy a new home can provide some flexibility for homeowners.

“It’s a way to purchase [a home] using the product up front,” he said.

RMF is one reverse mortgage lender that sees the potential for the product to drive future business growth, and is focusing on making people aware the H4P exists.

4. Defer Social Security Benefits With Income Support

Americans become eligible to draw from Social Security at age 62, but benefits can increase up to 32% if they wait until age 70 to start collecting. Some people, however, may not have enough money to bridge the eight-year gap. That’s where a reverse mortgage comes in, Salter says.

Using term payments from a reverse mortgage — getting equal monthly payments for a fixed period of time — can make up for the lack of Social Security benefits during that eight-year period so the borrower can maximize their retirement income.

5. Use Reverse Mortgage as Alternative to Longevity Insurance

Borrowers can initiate a line of credit today and convert that to a tenure payment — or equal monthly payments for life as long as the borrower remains in the home — at a later date.

Doing so gives the homeowner similar benefits that a deferred annuity would provide, while their asset control is never given up to an insurance company.

Ultimately, whatever strategy is used will allow older Americans to tap their home equity in a way that can provide extra income and more retirement security.

As the nation approaches the “retirement apocalypse,” reminding clients that their home is a resource can help financial advisors better plan for their future needs.

“Just letting people know that [their home equity is] a backstop or another resource that’s available to them [is important],” Channer said. “It’s cooled my concern about being able to work with clients and ensure their financial security; it’s taken some pressure off of that. And in clients’ minds, once they see that as a viable resource, it starts to take the pressure off of them.”

Article from Reverse Mortgage Daily, written by Emily Study, May 28, 2015
http://reversemortgagedaily.com/2015/05/28/5-ways-reverse-mortgages-can-serve-as-retirement-planning-tool/#more-24542

Things to Consider About Aging In Place

Seniors in home remodeling

Retrofit my Existing Home or Move?

Reprint from Article Written for The Union Grass Valley Newspaper on April 28, 2015

A recent survey by Genworth Financial, a long term care insurer, noted that while overall long term care costs continue to rise, paying for care services in home is still the cheapest option*. Being close allies here in Grass Valley with local and may I say, beautiful assisted living communities, aging in place in one’s home is not for everyone, the thought of having meals prepared by gourmet chefs and lots of activities to choose from is enticing indeed. However, some of my clients complete a reverse mortgage credit line to tap into their home equity for funds to retrofit their homes for the next stage of life’s journey.

What is the typical cost of a retrofit? The MetLife Report on Aging in Place 2.0** recently reported the cost for design and structural modifications for a one story home will cost an average of $9,000 to $12,000.

What are smaller projects to consider? Replacement hardware, sturdy handrails, grab bars, single handled faucets, higher sitting toilets, rollout shelving in kitchens, and lighting in hard to see spots are all relatively easy and cost conservative.

If I funds are available, larger projects for electric scooter or wheelchair access; widening doorways, corridors, and ramps are bigger picture retrofits.

In home health costs are reportedly rising at a slower pace than facility-based care. According to the Genworth study, in-home health aide costs rose approximately 1.27% over a one year period compared to assisted living and semi-private nursing home care rising an average of 2.86% and 3.77% respectively.

Seniors in home with in home care provider

There’s no pre-determined correct path in this next stage in a senior’s life, it’s all about hopefully having the financial ability to exercise a conscious choice. In addition to a reverse mortgage credit line being used to retrofit a senior’s existing home, a reverse mortgage can fund assisted living/dementia care for one owner on title, as long the other owner on title to the home remains in the home as their principle residence. Also, an existing home can be sold to buy, via reverse mortgage for purchase, an already senior retrofit home.

One of my clients commented recently that they felt I conducted my business more like a consultant, not only a loan officer: someone who would listen to concerns and offer options, this after we spent time going over their future living and financial considerations; preparing for big picture changes for them as they entered their mid-70’s. Aging is not for the faint of heart, we all are moving forward in the journey of maturing and entering into new life stages. If you’d like to sort through some of your options with me, call for a personal appointment or attend one of my monthly Reverse Mortgage Workshops held in my local Grass Valley Office, lunch is catered and the last comment from several of the April workshop group: ” Shawna, that was fun!”

A closing thought: the recent HUD reverse mortgage program change requiring me to do a borrower financial assessment at the time of loan application is no reason to allow any lender to panic or pressure you, give me a call, I’ve got you covered for explaining this change!

Shawna McDonald has successfully completed hundreds of reverse mortgages and is approved with 8 reverse mortgage lenders. Her office, Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage, is located at 412 E. Main Street Suite N, Grass Valley, (530) 497-3010. Her website is www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com.

The opinions expressed here are solely those of Shawna McDonald, Loan Officer/Real Estate Broker. Copyright © 2015. All Rights Reserved, duplication and distribution prohibited. Shawna McDonald NMLS #271335 CA-BRE # 00585530 DBA Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage and Borba Investments Inc, DBA MLS Reverse Mortgage Auburn, CA NMLS #76801 BRE #01456165 ~ HUD approved lender. * 2015 Genworth Financial annual Cost of Care Survey     ** MetLife Report on Aging in Place 2.0, 2013

The Affluent Turn to Reverse Mortgages to Slow Down 401K Draws & The Myth Debunked, Again

cruise-woman_3170504b

A fascinating article by the Wall Street Journal chronicles a trend that I too am seeing in my office: folks who own an expensive home free and clear, or have a small loan outstanding, coming in and establishing a reverse mortgage credit line to fund the upkeep of their home, their other monthly bills, and for travel. A couple of my clients just returned from cruises and have never felt more contentment in retirement as they do now, POST set up of a reverse mortgage credit line.

One comment universally expressed by all clients particularly caught my attention, and paraphrase: “We had to leave our beautiful home every day while we were working; now that we are retired we don’t want to move and down size, we want to fully enjoy our home, and yet, we want to do a little travel”

One goal also universally expressed by all: once the RM loan was complete, they were ceasing draws on their 401K’s beyond the required, all clients had monthly incomes, however it wasn’t quite enough for a comfortable lifestyle, thus they had been turning to draws on retirement funds.

Could they have continued to do so? Yes, however, by keeping future 401K draws to a minimum while the stock market is doing well, they would be allowing their 401K’s time to rebuild from the economic downturn. Increasing numbers of financial planners are recommending this RM credit line strategy as part of a 401k rebuilding plan.

Unfortunately I continue to need to debunk “the myth”. One of my clients reported back to me they were told, and I paraphrase, “You have now given the house to the lender”. This statement is incorrect: With any type of RM loan, the borrower(s) remain the owner(s) on title, thus the house is titled just like it would be with any other type of loan. And, just like any other type of loan, at the time the house is sold, by the borrower(s), or their heir(s), the RM loan is paid off and all remaining equity goes to the borrower(s) or their heir(s). As with any loan type, if home equity preservation is a goal, then borrowing modestly is advised.

Have questions? Call to schedule a private consultation or reserve a spot for my next monthly workshop: Thursday April 16th, 2015. Shawna McDonald Loan Officer, has successfully completed hundreds of reverse mortgages and is approved with 8 reverse mortgage lenders, ensuring clients receive low fees and great rates. (530) 497-3010. Her local office: Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage 412 E. Main Street Suite N, Grass Valley.                                                         The website is www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com.

The WSJ article referenced herein: “When Even Wealthy Homeowners Are Using Reverse Mortgages, The Question is: Why Aren’t You?” published on October 9, 2014.

The opinions expressed here are those of Shawna McDonald Copyright © 2015.     Shawna McDonald NMLS #271335 CA-BRE # 00585530 DBA Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage and Borba Investments Inc, DBA MLS Reverse Mortgage Auburn, CA NMLS #76801 BRE #01456165 ~ HUD approved lender.