Purchase Reverse Mortgage or Post Sale Reverse Mortgage?

Seniors sold sign

I often see clients considering downsizing and selling their existing home to purchase a more modest home.

The decision: “Do I sell my existing home and pay all cash for the replacement home and THEN get a reverse mortgage line of credit or, do a reverse mortgage for purchase on the replacement home?

As well as being a licensed loan officer I am a real estate broker and have known in theory that it is risky to pay all cash on the new home and close escrow ASSUMING the replacement home will qualify for a reverse mortgage post sale, but have not had actual examples until, unfortunately, this year where I had several examples.

I did not meet with the individuals in these examples prior to the purchase of their replacement home; they came in post close of escrow to inquire about taking out a RM credit line. The sale of their prior home did not cover the price of the replacement home, causing them to dip heavily into savings accounts to pay all cash. In doing preliminary research on their properties I had to deliver the bad news: their replacement properties would not qualify for a reverse mortgage and they were shocked.

How could a reverse mortgage for purchase process, rather than paying all cash, have protected these folks? The RM for purchase process protects an individual via the real estate purchase contract contingency clause, giving them several weeks or more to go through the loan qualifying process with a loan officer, appraiser and underwriter working on their behalf to determine if the property and they will qualify for a RM. If the property and they receive loan approval they can confidently close escrow knowing their financing will be in place. However, if going through the process it is determined the subject property or they will NOT qualify for a reverse mortgage, the individual can walk away during the contingency period and not lose their earnest money deposit.

It’s wise to see a loan professional well in advance of selling an existing home and looking for a replacement as there are numerous RM pre-approval steps required.

 

Shawna McDonald, License Loan Officer, has completed hundreds of reverse mortgage loans and is approved with 10 reverse mortgage lenders. She is available by appointment. Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage 412 E. Main Street Suite N, Grass Valley, (530) 497-3010. Her website is www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com. NMLS #271335 | CalBRE #00585530 Borba Investments Inc. Company NMLS #76801 |Company BRE # 01446165 These materials are not from, and were not approved by HUD or FHA

 

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New Thinking About Reverse Mortgages ~ Younger retirees may benefit from using a reverse-mortgage line of credit as interest rates rise ~

seniors hiking    Rising interest rates could make reverse-mortgage lines of credit more appealing to younger retirees.

A reverse mortgage is a type of loan taken against equity in a home, available to borrowers who are at least 62. It requires no monthly payments, with interest charges instead added to the loan balance and paid only after the homeowner sells or dies. The loan can be taken as a lump sum or as monthly income, or as a line of credit, with no interest charges on unused amounts.

Many homeowners wait until well beyond 62 to take a reverse mortgage, because generally the older the borrower is the more he or she will be qualified to borrow.

In recent years, though, more financial advisers have warmed up to the idea of homeowners taking a reverse-mortgage line of credit when they are as young as 62, as a way to boost their nest egg. The key to this strategy is that the credit line grows over time, by amounts tied to the course of interest rates, and the unused portion can be converted to a substantial monthly income years later. And today, with inflation and interest rates widely expected to rise, these credit lines could be particularly valuable.

“Now is an exceptionally good time to be considering adding a [reverse-mortgage] credit line to the retirement blueprint,” says Shelley Giordano, chair of the Funding Longevity Task Force at the American College of Financial Services. Interest rates are low, which increases the credit limit on reverse mortgages, she notes, and if rates rise over the life of the loan, that will add to the growth of the credit line. Since interest rates tend to rise alongside inflation, the growing line of credit would provide an inflation hedge, she says.

Running the numbers

“Research has shown that setting up a line of credit as soon as possible, age 62, in order to let it grow and only tapping into the line of credit when needed can substantially improve the long-term sustainability of a retirement-income portfolio, meaning you can make your money last longer,” says Jamie Hopkins, associate professor of taxation at the American College of Financial Services.

The strategy—called a standby reverse mortgage, or SRM, by some—has been pushed in financial journals by a number of academics, starting with a 2012 paper by Barry H. Sacks, a tax attorney in San Francisco, and his brother Stephen R. Sacks, a professor emeritus of economics at the University of Connecticut. They recommend drawing from the credit line when investments like stocks and bonds are down, so the homeowner enjoys a steady income and gives other investments time to recover, allowing them to last longer.

They said the strategy was successful in 1,000 Monte Carlo simulations, which run calculations over and over while varying key factors like interest rates and investment returns. Not only did it improve the borrower’s chances of enjoying steady income to an advanced age, it could also produce a larger income along the way, they reported.

Not for everyone

The chief downside: Sums taken through any reverse mortgage, including any amount actually borrowed through a line of credit, reduce the equity available for other purposes—like moving to another home or buying into an assisted-care facility—or for the homeowner’s heirs.

“It may not be best for a short-term play” because of the time it will take for the growth of the credit line to offset the cost, “or if one wishes to leave a home free and clear [of debt] to their heirs,” says Steven Klein, reverse-mortgage director with AmCap Mortgage, in Greenville, S.C.

But over many years, the credit line can grow to be quite large, especially if interest rates rise. Here’s how it works: These credit lines carry adjustable interest rates that typically reset every month or every year. Once the initial credit limit is set—based on interest rates, the homeowner’s age, the home’s value and its location—it grows each year by the current interest rate on the loan plus 1.25 percentage points, which is the loan’s annual mortgage-insurance charge.

For example,  a 62-year-old borrower with a $400,000 home in the Philadelphia suburbs a credit line starting at $200,668, at an initial rate of 5.70%—a 4.45% interest rate on the loan plus the 1.25% insurance charge. If the interest rate doesn’t change, the credit line will grow 5.70% a year, reaching more than $600,000 in 20 years. It could then be converted to a monthly income of nearly $5,000—less if any of the credit has been used—based on standard industry formulas. If interest rates go higher, the credit line would be larger; if they fall, it wouldn’t grow as much.

Taking a credit line at an early age could also mitigate the danger of the home’s value falling, a decline that would reduce the amount of credit available through a reverse mortgage taken later. And the credit line grows regardless of changes in the home’s value. If the home’s value soars, the homeowner could scrap the old credit line and take out a new, larger one against the higher value.

“A reverse-mortgage line of credit can be a saving grace for the baby boomers who simply do not have enough retirement savings” if home equity is ignored, Prof. Hopkins says. “If home equity is incorporated more strategically in the future, we will see vast improvements in the financial security of retirees.”

This is a reprint of an article written by Jeff Brown in February of 2017.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-thinking-about-reverse-mortgages-148695516

LEARN ABOUT REVERSE MORTGAGES IN THE COMFORT OF MY GRASS VALLEY OFFICE…WE CAN ALSO EXPLORE WHAT YOUR APPROXIMATE QUALIFICATION NUMBERS ARE ALL ABOUT, CALL 530-497-3010 FOR A PERSONAL APPOINTMENT.

~Shawna

Purchase Reverse Mortgages Grow in Popularity

Senior in a new home

BUYING A HOME IN RETIREMENT ~ But I Thought I’d Have to Pay all Cash !

 

This real estate season of 2016 I am seeing home buyers 62 years of age and older utilizing in greater numbers the Reverse Mortgage Purchase Loan; a loan that expands home buying power and conserves a nest egg from the sale of an existing home. Here’s an example:

Wanting to downsize, Karen and Jim are retired 76 year olds whose home sold for $550,000.Their replacement home costs $400,000, however their retirement income does not qualify for a conventional loan, they thought their only option was to pay cash, doing so leaves them $150,000 from their home sale, not as large a nest egg as hoped for.

Enter the RM Purchase Loan:  income qualifying is to prove ability to meet on-going property taxes, home insurance, (and HOA) obligations; thus qualifying for a RM Purchase Loan is less stringent than for a conventional loan. On a home valued at $400,000, Karen and Jim’s down payment is $171,000 (43% of the purchase price), a far cry from paying all cash of $400,000. The balance of the purchase price plus fees is their RM mortgage. Just as with all reverse mortgages, they will be monthly mortgage payment free.

 THE BIG NEWS: instead of having a nest egg of $150,000 from the sale of their original home had they paid all cash for the replacement home, the RM Purchase Loan allowed them a residual nest egg of $379,000. Could a RM Purchase Loan have been used to buy a higher priced home than their original home of $550,000? Generally speaking yes; folks I have worked with have obtained their dream home with a RM Purchase Loan.

A RM Purchase Loan is titled with Karen and Jim as owners of the home, (they do NOT give up ownership of the home, a common RM misconception). The home can be sold by them or heirs, the reverse mortgage paid off, and they or heirs keep the remaining equity. As with any home loan, it is required that property tax, maintenance, and home insurance obligations be kept current.

This is an exciting program opening up more possibilities for seniors, give me a call if you would like to see your personalized loan scenario and obtain program details.

Shawna McDonald, Loan Officer has successfully completed hundreds of reverse mortgages. Approved with 8 of the largest reverse mortgage lenders in the nation, she is available by appointment; her local office, Sierra Foothills Reverse Mortgage, is located at 412 E. Main St. Suite N, Grass Valley, (530) 497-3010. The website is www.SierraFoothillsReverse.com.

INMLS #271335 BRE 00585530 Borba Investments, Auburn, CA Company NMLS #76801 Company BRE #01456165

5 Ways Reverse Mortgages Serve as a Retirement Tool

Senior studying paperwork

In today’s world, Americans face a looming retirement crisis — one that has been well-documented over the past several years and which has created a new purpose for the reverse mortgage.

Gone are the days when reverse mortgages were considered a loan of last resort. Now, the product is gaining steam among financial planners as a retirement tool that can hedge against future costs and provide much-needed income during borrowers’ post-career days.

By using a reverse mortgage to tap into home equity and fund retirement expenses, homeowners can effectively defend against the imminent retirement crisis, research shows.

“A lot of times people have not accumulated [savings] in a disciplined way, but at the same time the value of their homes has appreciated dramatically,” said Dennis Channer, principal at Cornerstone Investment Advisors. “A great deal of their wealth is tied up in that value. [Home equity] becomes another available resource in the long range forecast of being successful [in retirement].”

And that’s just what Wednesday’s webinar, “Standby Reverse Mortgages: A Portfolio Longevity Strategy,” was focused on teaching. Its purpose was to educate financial advisors on how a home equity conversion mortgage (HECM) could be used as a portfolio protection strategy.

“The ideas are endless on the different angles we can take on using the [reverse mortgage],” said Dr. John Salter, an associate professor of financial planning at Texas Tech University, who has educated financial planners on reverse mortgages for years. “There’s nothing wrong with the product.”

While the ways to use a reverse mortgage may be endless, Salter explained five strategies, in particular, for financial planners to keep in mind when clients are approaching retirement.

1. Use Reverse Mortgage Instead of HELOC

There are benefits borrowers can get from using a reverse mortgage that they can’t get from using a HELOC, Salter said. Among those benefits are line of credit growth, no monthly principle or interest payment, and the loan is not cancelable as long as requirements are met.

“If you’re looking for flexibility in repaying [the loan], you get that in a reverse mortgage; you don’t get that in a HELOC,” he added.

A HECM is also non-recourse, meaning the borrower or their estate will never owe more than the value of the home upon sale or death.

The only downside of a reverse mortgage is the age requirement, as there is no restriction on age when using a HELOC.

2. Refinance Existing Mortgage With a HECM

Use a HECM to refinance an existing mortgage, and either pay it off or not, Salter said.

In doing so, a borrower can eliminate their monthly mortgage payment.

3. Take Advantage of HECM For Purchase

While the HECM For Purchase (H4P) market has yet to take off, Salter said using a reverse mortgage to buy a new home can provide some flexibility for homeowners.

“It’s a way to purchase [a home] using the product up front,” he said.

RMF is one reverse mortgage lender that sees the potential for the product to drive future business growth, and is focusing on making people aware the H4P exists.

4. Defer Social Security Benefits With Income Support

Americans become eligible to draw from Social Security at age 62, but benefits can increase up to 32% if they wait until age 70 to start collecting. Some people, however, may not have enough money to bridge the eight-year gap. That’s where a reverse mortgage comes in, Salter says.

Using term payments from a reverse mortgage — getting equal monthly payments for a fixed period of time — can make up for the lack of Social Security benefits during that eight-year period so the borrower can maximize their retirement income.

5. Use Reverse Mortgage as Alternative to Longevity Insurance

Borrowers can initiate a line of credit today and convert that to a tenure payment — or equal monthly payments for life as long as the borrower remains in the home — at a later date.

Doing so gives the homeowner similar benefits that a deferred annuity would provide, while their asset control is never given up to an insurance company.

Ultimately, whatever strategy is used will allow older Americans to tap their home equity in a way that can provide extra income and more retirement security.

As the nation approaches the “retirement apocalypse,” reminding clients that their home is a resource can help financial advisors better plan for their future needs.

“Just letting people know that [their home equity is] a backstop or another resource that’s available to them [is important],” Channer said. “It’s cooled my concern about being able to work with clients and ensure their financial security; it’s taken some pressure off of that. And in clients’ minds, once they see that as a viable resource, it starts to take the pressure off of them.”

Article from Reverse Mortgage Daily, written by Emily Study, May 28, 2015
http://reversemortgagedaily.com/2015/05/28/5-ways-reverse-mortgages-can-serve-as-retirement-planning-tool/#more-24542